Reviews: Share Your Mirena Experience

Doctors can only offer textbook advice and a general explanation of what their patients have told them. Unless they use it themselves, except for statistics, they really have no idea what the average women’s experience with Mirena IUC is.  That is what this post is for. There are two purposes for this post. 1. To give women a place to go to read many actual experiences with Mirena reviews written by women that they can relate to. 2. To give women a voice so that whether good or bad, they can share their experience with others.

Please Keep In Mind…

Most of us did not ace high school English, I didn’t and I’m sure just by reading my own content on this site you could find many English mistakes. Even so, we all can take the time to write something that will be readable by others. I do not want to edit anyone’s experience, that would defeat the purpose of this site. So, please to the best of your ability use proper English. Use your spell check and do not write in all caps. All experiences will be added to this site in the form of blog posts and added to relevant categories chosen by you. Experiences under 300 words may be posted in groups with other similar experiences and put in the appropriate categories. Posts over 300 words will be given their own post.

My hopes for this website is that it will not just be seen as a place where people can speak solely negative or solely positive about Mirena. I hope that everyone will contribute so that all experiences can be shared. Good and bad. My personal experience with Mirena is that even though I had some issues in the beginning, that overall I really like my Mirena. Some women would say the same about theirs, some won’t. But all voices should be heard. I set up some guidelines in hopes that it keeps this site as easy to read, navigate, share, and learn from as possible. I want to share all experiences, but I will not allow any profanity, or other conduct that is inappropriate. This needs to be a safe place. I will read and moderate all comments and experiences before posting them to assure this.

Once your experience has been posted, I will let you know where you can find it. From that point on you can check back to view the comments and if you wish to, respond to others if they have questions. Please do not give medical advice. The majority of us are not doctors, and those who are doctors know it’s better that a person receive medical advice from ones own doctor.

Because my first article about Mirena was so popular, and the potential for this website to see the same amount if not more in the form of the response, advertising may be added to this website in the future as a way to help cover the costs of hosting and maintaining it.

On this year’s naughty list

Cybercriminals are now using social media sites like Twitter and Facebook to lure unsuspecting consumers to malicious sites.

Below, Trend Micro has compiled the threats that every online shopper should be wary of.

Coupons & Advertisements That Put the ‘red’ in Rudolph’s Nose

  • Discounts, coupons and special offers are used by malware authors to entice users into clicking malicious links
  • Advertisements placed on high-trafficked websites such as Twitter and Facebook are sometimes used as triggers for malware downloads

Fake Charity Sites Abusing Generosity, Rewarding Scrooges

  • The holiday seasons sets most users into a “giving mood”, making the holidays the perfect time for scammers and malware authors to carry out their schemes

Greeting Cards Delivering Bad Tidings and Viruses

  • E-cards are often used by spammers and malware authors as a decoy for users to click malicious links. This type of attack usually takes advantage of holiday seasons, when users are likely to send out e-cards
  • Clicking the link or opening the attachment then leads to malware being downloaded into the affected system

Holiday Shopping Search Results

  • Query results for certain strings are rigged with a malicious script that leads to various payloads
  • In certain cases, malware authors bank on different seasons in choosing which strings will yield the malicious results

Gift Cards Giveth and Gift Cards Taketh

  • Shopping rewards such as gift cards or cash may be used to lure users into participating in a survey
  • What the user does not know is that the survey page is actually a phishing site and that it is part of a plot to steal confidential information

HOW TO TALK TO YOUR KIDS ABOUT ONLINE SAFETY

The kids are back at school, and we’re heading into fall. I’m sure for most families they’ve started their daily routines, which consist of something along the lines of making sure the kids are picked up on time, dinner is on the table, the pets are taken care of and everyone’s homework is completed before going to bed at a reasonable time. It feels like we’re trying to pack more and more activities into our days, and the days aren’t getting any longer. At least when it comes to homework, today’s kids have the benefit of the Internet and having millions of resources at their fingertips to help with their homework. It’s amazing how times have changed.

Now I have children of my own; two tweens whom use computers on a daily basis. Instead of whines of boredom or cries for homework help in the house, I have noticed as my kids have gotten older that they are fewer and far between. Don’t get me wrong, I cherish those moments of peace. That said, I know that those quiet moments are given to me by what I call the “one-eyed babysitter” – the computer. Like most moms, I work outside the home. The difference is just who I work for and what I do. I work for a large Internet Security company and focus my attention on technology that keeps families safe from Internet threats. Those peaceful moments usually signal one thing to me. My children are playing on the Internet surfing the Web, emailing, texting and doing much more.

The Internet gives us so much useful, important and educational information. At the same time – as a mother and a security expert I know that the Internet could prove to be a danger for my family. Every family has to deal with these security issues when they have technology that connects to the Web including PCs, MACs, iPhones, iTouches etc. It’s imperative that everyone, including the children, know about the potential dangers in order to surf the web safely. Talking to your children about online safety is just as important as having the most up-to-date security software. Sitting down with your children at the computer and showing them the various threats and how to avoid them is one way to introduce cyber safety. However, most parents that I talk to are not aware of all the latest threats online.

When it comes to kids’ online safety, there are some areas of risk that my company Trend Micro has identified. What parents need to know is that kids are at risk of the following:

  • Being targeted by aggressive or unwanted commercialism (ads or marketing that is intrusive and/or age-inappropriate). Some sites for kids are guilty of serving up ads that are simply inappropriate for kids (such as dating services, gambling sites). They are funded through advertising money, and are careless about thinking through the implications of the ads they are showing to the users of their sites. Some ads are designed to be so engaging, the child thinks it’s a game and not an ad, so they are enticed to click away. This could end up infecting their parents’ computers with malicious software that can spy and/or steal information from them.
  • Being a victim of security threats such as hack attacks or scams. Social networking sites are popular among young people and cybercriminals alike. While kids are not necessarily the intended victims of crime perpetrated on these sites, they can be at risk simply because they use them. Some cybercrimes are designed to impact as many people as possible – they do not discriminate based on age. Criminals will use techniques that seem normal to the average user to lead someone to download malicious software without their knowledge (a technique called social engineering). An example of this is when a young person is offered to view a racy photo or video of someone.
  • Being more uninhibited with what they say or do online because they believe they have anonymity. Kids can put themselves at risk, too. Posting information or photos of themselves that they did not intend the world to see can damage their reputations, candidacy for a job, or admission to a college. Posting too much personally identifying information (PII) can open themselves up to identity theft (even kids can be victims of this). Harassing others, if considered violent, lewd, or racist can be considered a crime. Creating or distributing music, movies, or video games that are illegally copied or infringe on copyrights is illegal.

I don’t want to cause unnecessary alarm and give doomsday predications. I believe that knowledge is the best armor when dealing with the above topics. The Internet is a necessary tool in the digital age and can help educate the family in numerous ways. What I find is that parents truly want to help protect against the pitfalls but are unaware of the tools to use in order to do so. Part of the solution is relying on good old fashion parenting skills – time limits, open conversation etc. The other part of the solution lies in technology that can help limit the risk and act as a tool to continue talks with kids. Using both techniques, you’ll keep you and your family safe from online threats and enjoy all the positives that the Web offers.

Trend Micro’s Social Networking Safety Quiz

    1. What types of malicious attacks occur on Facebook?


Bullying

Identity Theft

Virus Infection

B and C

All of the above

    1. Flickr is not a social networking site


True

False

    1. How many social networking sites exist today?


Three: Facebook, Twitter and MySpace

10

20

More than 50

    1. Children obey the outlined age restrictions on social networking sites


True

False

    1. Which social networking sites do cybercriminals use to infect your computer?


Facebook and Twitter

Flickr and YouTube

Yahoo! Messenger and Windows Live Messenger

Just MySpace

All of the above

None of the above

    1. Teens and tweens cannot become victims of cyberbullying because they have control over their friends’ and followers’ networks


True

False

    1. Facebook’s “Age Gate” feature is effective at preventing children under the age of 13 from creating an account.


True

False

    1. Cyberbullying can occur on any device as long as there is Internet access.


True

False

    1. Facebook’s default privacy settings keep user’s personal information, such as birthdates and profile pictures, secret from third party app developers?


True

False

    1. The Federal Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998 (COPPA) is sufficient to protect children who falsify their birthdates to use Facebook.


True

False

    1. What information should you avoid posting on social networking sites?


Your home address

Vacation plans

Your birthday

All of the above

    1. What is the best way to monitor your children’s activity on social networking sites?


Ask them what they have been doing on the site

Become their “friend”

Allow them to log on only when supervised

Use a comprehensive monitoring and reporting tool

All of the above

Trend Micro’s Network Security IQ Quiz

    1. My son has gaming devices and my daughter has a Playstation. Their game devices don’t need any security – threats are only on the computer.


True

False

    1. If my computer is set up to receive automatic security updates, then I’m automatically secure.


True

False

    1. I prevent intruders from accessing my wireless network by:


A password

Restricting access to unknown computers

I just hope they can’t pick up wireless on their laptops

Both A and B

    1. If I use a dial up it may slow down my computer but will keep me safe from threats that could steal my identity, right?


True

False

    1. I chat a lot on AIM, Google Chat and Yahoo Messenger. What details below should I leave off my profile to avoid getting hacked?


Pet names

Mother’s maiden name

Nicknames

Phone numbers

All of the above

    1. Security attacks can come in the form of:


Virus

Phishing

Botnets

All of the above

    1. I keep the same password for pretty much everything. Which of the following is an example of a strong password?


Password

J*p2le04>F

Mother’s birth date

    1. To protect sensitive data on my computer, it’s best to use:


Passwords

File permissions

Encryption

All of the above

    1. I don’t need to worry about security when I shop online with a national retailer. They automatically protect me.


True

False

    1. My computer came fully loaded and included security when I bought it a year ago. I’m fully protected.


True

False

Bonus Question

I use a Mac therefore I’m not exposed to security threats – I’m totally safe.

True
False

Trend Micro’s Internet Security Challenge: Parents vs. Kids

Parents challenge

    1. My kids know which sites are safe or unsafe.


True

False

    1. Which of the following do your kids (parents) know how to use safely?


Mobile phone

Desktop computer

Laptop

All of the above

None of the above

    1. Kids don’t usually access dangerous websites.


True

False

    1. Cybercriminals are easy to detect for kids (parents).


True

False

    1. If necessary, my kids (parents) know how to:


Start the virus scan

Clear any infected files

Avoid a phishing scam or fake anti-virus probe

All of the above

None of the above

    1. “Parental controls” means telling my kids (parents) which sites to use and not use.


True

False

    1. Children never click on ads they see online.


True

False

    1. My children use social media sites for ____ hours a day.


.5

one

two

three or more

an undetermined number of

zero: My kids (parents) don’t use social media sites

    1. My kids know not to put their personal information online when they use:


Facebook

Twitter

Email

Instant messaging

None of the above

    1. Facebook is safe for kids if:


They do not friend people they do not know

They do not post any personal information on Facebook

They are aware of the privacy controls and what information they should and should not post, as well as their friends

They allow only “friends of friends” to see their profile

Kids Challenge

    1. Too keep our computer secure, my parents:


Use passwords

Use Internet Security

Don’t browse dangerous sites

Nothing

I’m not sure

    1. My parents know how to fully protect our computer so I can visit any site I want.


True

False

    1. Which of the following do you think your parents (kids) downloaded security software for?


Mobile phone

Desktop computer

Laptop

All of the above

None of the above

    1. Cybercriminals do not target adults because they don’t have their own bank accounts.


True

False

    1. My parents are aware of the following threats:


Phishing scams

Botnets and Trojans

Fake anti-virus

Malware and Spyware

All or some of the above

None of the above

    1. I taught my parents how to use the Internet.


True

False

    1. My parents know how many hours I use the Internet.


True

False

    1. My parents know I use:


Facebook, Twitter or other social media sites

Email

Instant messaging

None of the above

All or some of the above

    1. My parents have established security software to protect me when I:


Use Facebook, Twitter, or other social media site

Use email

Browse the Internet

Instant message

All of the above

Some of the above

    1. My parents are:


Tech savvy

Tech challenged

Know enough to make sure my computer/laptop is safe